Health Surveillance

Health surveillance means having a system in place to look for early signs of ill health caused by substances and other hazards at work. It includes keeping health records for individuals and may involve routine self-checks, questionnaires or medical examinations to inform the employer (or self employed person) if corrective action is needed.

Health Surveillance is not needed for most workers but in some situations and for some exposures / activities it is required by law.

Much if not all health surveillance is governed by statue and / or Health and Safety Executive guidance. However the frequency and types of surveillance should be entirely governed by exposure to health hazards. So if you are not exposed then you do not need any monitoring.

National Services Scotland

What is Health Surveillance and why is it important 

 - Detecting ill health effects at an early stage so that employers can introduce better controls to prevent them from getting worse.

 - Providing data to help employers evaluate health risks.

 - Enabling employees to raise concerns about how work affects their health.

 - Highlighting lapses in workplace control measures, therefore providing invaluable feedback to the risk assessment.

 - Providing an opportunity to reinforce training and education (e.g. on the impact of health effects and the use of protective equipment)

Health surveillance can sometimes be used to help to identify where more needs to be done to control risks and where early signs of work-related health are detected, employers should take action to prevent harm and protect employees.

 

Skin Health Surveillance

As a healthcare employer that provides high quality patient care we need to ensure that those who provide that care are fit and well, and part of that means looking after our skin.

Work related skin problems are common within the health and social care sector, as employees have to carry out hand hygiene on a frequent basis and their skin can also regularly be exposed to chemicals or other materials used in the manufacture of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves.

NSS cannot eliminate all known risks to the skin health of staff.  Therefore, it is essential that measures are implemented to detect any health problem that might arise through an effective skin health surveillance programme, this allows for preventative action to be taken in order to safeguard the health of the employee.  Skin health surveillance also helps inform future risk assessments and control measures and can provide assurance that workplace controls are adequate. 

It is the manager’s responsibility within each area to identify those who require to be part of the skin surveillance programme and ensure there are enough Responsible Persons within their area to complete the required surveillance as per our policy, a link to which can be found below.

Training for Responsible Persons can be arranged through the Occupational Health Department.

 

If you require additional information you can contact the NSS Occupational Health Advisors through HR Connect Contact Us / Occupational Health

NHS Golden Jubilee

Skin Health Surveillance

As a healthcare employer that provides high quality patient care we need to ensure that those who provide that care are fit and well, and part of that means looking after our skin.

Work related skin problems are common within the health and social care sector, as employees have to carry out hand hygiene on a frequent basis and their skin can also regularly be exposed to chemicals or other materials used in the manufacture of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as gloves.

NHS Golden Jubilee cannot eliminate all known risks to the skin health of staff.  Therefore, it is essential that measures are implemented to detect any health problem that might arise through an effective skin health surveillance programme, this allows for preventative action to be taken in order to safeguard the health of the employee.  Skin health surveillance also helps inform future risk assessments and control measures and can provide assurance that workplace controls are adequate. 

It is the manager’s responsibility within each area to identify those who require to be part of the skin surveillance programme and ensure there are enough Responsible Persons within their area to complete the required surveillance as per our policy, a link to which can be found below.

Training for Responsible Persons can be arranged through the Occupational Health Department.

A learnpro module is also being developed.

Public Health Scotland

Public Health Scotland content is being designed for this page, in the interim please refer to the National Services Scotland Tab for support. 
If you require additional information you can contact the NSS Occupational Health Advisors through HR Connect Contact Us / Occupational Health.