Physiotherapy

There is an acknowledgement that accessing physiotherapy can take some time through the normal route, and the aim of providing a physiotherapy service is to either prevent absence from work, or reduce the recovery time, allowing the employee to return to work sooner.

National Services Scotland

Fast Track Physio offered by IPRS (Injury, Prevention, Rehabilitation Services)

Promoting Attendance puts an emphasis upon managers pro-actively managing employees who are absent through sickness, including early referral to occupational health on day one for musculoskeletal and stress related problems with the purpose of accessing early intervention and enabling an early return to work.

As a result of a concerted effort and a co-ordinated approach to managing absence at service and corporate level, NSS overall sickness absence levels have improved, albeit there are clear hot-spots.

There is an acknowledgement that accessing physiotherapy can take some time through the normal route, and the aim of providing this new physiotherapy service is to either prevent absence from work, or reduce the recovery time, allowing the employee to return to work sooner. To ensure the opportunity to deliver an equitable service to all staff across Scotland, NSS have entered into a framework agreement with the Scottish Ambulance Service for the provision of Physiotherapy Services.

The procurement process has been completed and our new physiotherapy services will be provided by Injury Prevention Rehabilitation Services (IPRS).

Physiotherapy will be accessible to all employees who are unable to carry out a full range of duties due to musculoskeletal problems and where the condition is having an adverse impact on their ability to do their day-to-day job.  The cost will still be charged to the employees department if the manager is in agreement.  It is also advisable that the employee discusses their condition with their GP to ensure that the referral is appropriate, and utilise the NHS Physiotherapy Service for ongoing chronic problems.

The NSS physiotherapy service will now be accessed through a Physiotherapy Management Referral via the Central NSS Occupational Health Team.  If you require further information or have any questions contact the NSS Occupational Health Advisors through HR Connect Contact Us / Occupational Health

The physiotherapy process map is attached below for information and guidance.

Once received by the NSS Occupational Health Team they will contact the referred employee by telephone to ascertain what assistance may be needed.  Musculoskeletal related referrals will be passed to IPRS Health for further assistance.

 

NHS 24

NHS 24 offers an In House Physiotherapy Service for all staff members to help and support for muscle, back or joint problems (commonly known as MSK).

The service currently offers assessments in Cardonald and Norseman House. However, if you work in another site, a telephone or video assessment can be made available. 

Self referrals can be made by completing the below In-House Physiotherapy Self Referral Form. The completed forms should be sent to inhousephysiotherapy@nhs24.scot.nhs.uk

Public Health Scotland

Public Health Scotland content is being designed for this page, in the interim please refer to the National Services Scotland Tab for support. 
If you require additional information you can contact the NSS Occupational Health Advisors through HR Connect Contact Us / Occupational Health

Scottish Ambulance Service

The purpose of these documents are to provide you with some general information on common musculo-skeletal complaints- and what actions you might take to alleviate discomforts felt.

One of the most effective means of sharing information on posture is by means of video clips, and in this respect there is little use in re-inventing the wheel when there is good stuff already out there on Youtube that professionals are willing to share.

These pages include general guidelines - and as always you must treat them with caution to avoid things being made worse. It is best to start any exercises with fewer reps than suggested to ensure they don't spark off any sharp pains or deep aches later on, and if all is well then gradually increase the workload. Part of the reason for this is that we have what are called stretch receptors in muscles which are designed to protect the muscle.  If you do a stretch before the muscle is warmed up or do movements too quickly then you won't get the full benefits as this protective mechanism will cut in early.

If you feel a particular exercise is not hitting the spot then best try another one.  It is normal to have a slight ache after a stretch or exercise which is doing good but an 'ache' is quite different from pain. Pain is NOT good - stop doing any exercise which causes pain and seek advice, particularly if the pain begins to travel across a rib, down an arm or leg.

In respect of back and neck related pain there are some warning signs that MUST NOT be ignored - and it is important to seek medical advice as soon as possible:

Unexplained weight loss
Fever of 38ºC (100.4ºF) or above
Swelling of the back
Constant back pain that does not ease after lying down or pain is worse at night
 (Unexplained) pain in your chest or high up in your back or pain down your legs and below the knees
Pain caused by a recent trauma or injury to your back
Loss of bladder control or inability to pass urine (emergency)
Loss of bowel control or numbness around your genitals, buttocks or back passage (emergency)


Also, if you have already been given a set of exercises by a Physio, Osteopath, Chiropractor or Sports Therapist then stick with the ones they gave you as they will be bespoke to you.

 

Line Managers please contact the SAS Hub on 0131 275 7890 Option 1 or by email to nss.sasoccupationalhealth@nhs.scot to request the password for IPRS reports.

The State Hospital

The State Hospital offers an In House Physiotherapy Service for all staff members to offer help and support for muscle, back or joint problems.

Self referrals can be made by telephoning 01555 842121.